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anybody have suggestions for magical realism books, like Gabriel Garcia Marquez but modern?

@ash Paulo Coelho is kind of an obvious one but folks rly like him
it's been a decade since I read the alchemist tho I can't speak personal

@ash how modern are you thinking? And do you have a preferred area for it to come from?

@bedap no preference for region, but anytime after the 90s is good. I've read a lot of the magical realism books written before that time

@ash A lot of the stuff that immediately comes to mind isn't exactly magical realism, but more descended from/related to magical realism. I'll keep thinking about it as I work tonight, but here's what jumps out at me:

Ana Hurtado (no novels yet 😔): strangehorizons.com/author/ana
firesidefiction.com/balompie

Tears of the Trufflepig by Fernando Flóres, which walks the line between MR, near-future dystopian SF, and just kinda... strange.

Kuzhali Manickavel: her books are mostly very short flash fiction and they are fucking weird. I love them. Again, not *quite* MR, but definitely a kindred artistic response to colonialism.

Ways of Going Home (Formas de volver a casa) by Alejandro Zambra is realism, but it plays with memory in really interesting ways that makes it feel like magical realism.

@ash Also, one time I was at a panel called "SoCal Magical Realism," and these were some of the authors either discussed or on the panel. I haven't read any of them myself, so this isn't necessarily a recommendation lol.

Ben Loory
Bonnie ZoBell
Andrew Roes
Heather Fowler
Daniel Olivas

There are a few other that I can't find on my shelf right now, so I'll send them along when I think of them!

@ash I hope you find something in there you like! It's honestly been pretty difficult to find post-90s magical realism for me. It seems like something that a lot of literary traditions grew past but that the US still eats up, for some reason

@ash Oh I just remembered Fruit of the Drunken Tree by Ingrid Rojas Contreras, which just came out last year! This one might be just what you're looking for ^_^

@ash So I wouldn't put it super strongly into that category (the author herself doesn't think it's a great fit as a descriptor), but Signal to Noise by Silvia Moreno-Garcia has a bit of magic in it and is an absolutely incredible book set in 1980s Mexico City (with a frame story in the modern day).

@ash I'm really enjoying Dhalgren by Samuel Delany.

I don't know why people talk a lot of shit about Murakami, but I enjoyed Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World very much.

@ash there's barely a hint of magical realism in them, but Jordi Soler's "La Guerra Perdida" trilogy is tremendous.

@ash Some of the stories in the collection “The Assimilated Cuban’s Guide to Quantum Santería” by Carlos Hernandez, in particular the title story, would count as modern magic realism.

#Latino #Book #Author

@ash the two books that come to mind are the strange and beautiful sorrows of ava lavender (leslye walton) and the golem and the jinni (helene wecker). i also second signal to noise, which i loved.

@ash I'm currently reading "Jerusalem", by Alan Moore. It's extremely long, and I'm not 100% sure how well it qualifies as magic realism (probably the first third more than the second third, that I'm in now), but it's amazing. The best thing I've read in years.

@ash Jose Saramago? Death With Interruptions is nice, but the style takes a little getting used to

@ash
I'll jump on the Murakami bandwagon, though I've only read two, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, which I enjoyed more and then later on I read 1Q84, the latter of which has some sexual abuse mentions in the book fyi.

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